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Author Topic: Summer 2010 work  (Read 6833 times)
Griff in Fairbanks
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« on: September 25, 2010, 12:07:40 PM »

About ten years ago, we dug a pit and laid the footings for a house.  Things happened and we got diverted to other issues, priorities, and projects.  Late last winter, I polled my wife, daughter, and son-in-law regarding what they thought I should work on this summer, from a list of possibilities.  Number one choice for my wife and daughter was the basement for the house.  (Even though I was only asking his opinion, I don't think my son-in-law was comfortable with the idea of 'telling me what I should do.')

This is how things were at the beginning of the summer ...


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Griff in Fairbanks
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« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2010, 12:16:52 PM »

... and at the end of the summer, when we quit because of the risk of mortar freezing before it cured ...


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Griff in Fairbanks
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« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2010, 01:27:25 PM »

This is a 3D concept for the basement ... main floor above and gambrel (barn) roof housing second floor.


* basement.jpg (95 KB, 1533x880 - viewed 250 times.)
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Leeann
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« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2010, 08:27:05 PM »

Looks pretty good to me - can't wait for summer to hit again to see further progress  Wink
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1973 Concord 20' Class A - 440/727
Griff in Fairbanks
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« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2010, 04:39:34 PM »

Looks pretty good to me - can't wait for summer to hit again to see further progress  Wink
Progress continues ... work on plans, organization, hunting good deals, etc.
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Griff in Fairbanks
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« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2010, 06:19:57 PM »

If I get the plans firmed up and have enough money saved up for preceding parts, I will begin assembling and storing parts of the exterior walls. (Semi-modular construction.)

The truck farmers here in interior Alaska consider May 15th to be the date after which a hard frost is unlikely.  I hold off until then so I don't risk freezing green mortar and grout.  Otherwise, I'd start sometime in March.  (I swept snow out of the cabin three times before I got the roof on when I built it.)

Some background on the design:  Basically, the house is a cube ... 24 feet by 24 feet, with three 8 foot high stories.  (Each floor is really a little over 9 feet high when you add in the floor framing, etc.)  A cube maximizes interior space while limiting exterior exposure, which is a distinct advantage when trying to heat a place at 50 below zero.  I added an 8' x 12' extension on the north for split level entry and to move the stairs outside the main part of the building.  Large windows or patio doors to the south, slightly smaller windows to the east and west, and minimum window/door area to the north.

Original plan called for the basement to be a woodworking shop (I build fine furniture, among other things) with a full bath.  Plan has been altered to incorporate two bedrooms and a kids' common area/family room.  Main floor will be a open great room, with kitchen, living, and dining areas, plus a half bath.  Upstairs will be master suite and library.  (Main floor and upstairs will be expanded by 2 feet on the east and west sides to 28' x 24'.)

I really hate paying any more than I absolutely have to for heat so I'm going for airtight, super-insulated construction.  R30 to R35 on the basement, augmented by earth backfill, R35 to R40 in the upper walls, and something approaching R70 in the attic.

Decor will be a rustic blend of country farmhouse and cabin, with Japanese & Korean influences thrown in.  (Imagine a late-1800's farmhouse converted into a country vacation home/cabin, which was upgraded only as necessary.)  A lot of emphasis on functionality, comfort, and livability.

The live-in basement will be geared towards kids' living ... bedrooms for relative privacy and a common area with couch, TV, DVD player, desk and computer.  (Four code-compliant egress windows for multiple escape avenues in the event of an emergency.)  The bathroom design, in particular, borrows heavily on Japanese and Korean design elements, especially the way entire bathrooms are designed to serve as washing and shower areas.  The entire floor, and at least half way up the walls, will be sealed with shower pan liner, covered with cement board, and tiled, with in-floor radiant heat.  Instead of the central floor drain and low curb across the door threshold typically found in Japanese and Korean bathrooms, I'll be sloping the floor towards the door and putting a trough-type drain across the doorway.  (If necessary, I'll be able drag a pressure-sprayer in there and blast it clean without worrying about anything.)

The main floor, with exposed beam ceiling and two patio doors facing south onto a 16' x 24' raised deck, will have lots of vintage elements, including a potbelly stove, Delft wall-mounted hand-crank coffee grinder, dime store bubble gum machine, and rustic lamps & fixtures.  One of the focal points of the 12' x 16' open kitchen will be a Kohler Gilford K-12700 sink (first picture below), on the east wall surrounded by windows overlooking the driveway.  The north wall will have an Aga Legacy stove and refrigerator, with a prep sink between them that has a faucet reminiscent of the old farmhouse hand pump (second picture below).

The kitchen island will have a Wolf Multifunction Cooktop (third picture below), for use with a wok, shabu-shabu pan, cast iron grill pan, or teppanyaki-style griddle, for Japanese restaurant style dining.  (The southwest corner of the house will have a table and chairs for Western-style dining.)



* Kitchen Sink K-12700.jpg (11.37 KB, 550x443 - viewed 242 times.)

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« Last Edit: February 14, 2011, 07:19:15 PM by Griff in Fairbanks » Logged

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Griff in Fairbanks
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« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2010, 06:40:27 PM »

The main floor half-bath will be all vintage, bordering on Victorian.  The toilet will be a high-tank, pull-chain type and the sink will be modeled on pitcher-and-washbasin stands found in hotels and homes in the late 1800's.

I've managed to track down a $79 (plus shipping) deal on a new vessel sink that normally sells for $200+, if you can find anyone that has them in stock.  (First picture below.)

We also found a rather unique faucet to go with it.  (Second picture below.)

Originally, I had planned to mount these on a dry sink-style vanity cabinet until I ran across the third and fourth pictures below.  Now, I'm planning to blend the wood, finish, and legs in the third picture with the 'furniture' style in the fourth picture.


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« Last Edit: March 07, 2011, 11:19:32 AM by Griff in Fairbanks » Logged

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Griff in Fairbanks
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« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2011, 01:44:03 PM »

Late breaking news:

For years (decades), I've been following a design style, in both the furniture and buildings I build, that I knew at an instinctual level but have never been able describe well.  It turns out to be the Craftsman Style, sometimes called the Arts and Crafts Movement or Greene and Greene style.

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Griff in Fairbanks
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« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2011, 01:47:37 PM »

Oh, BTW, the gambrel (barn) roof went bye-bye.  Too much time and material to frame it adequately so we're going with a 'simple' gable roof, with a 6 in 12 pitch, which actually fits the Craftsman/Arts and Crafts style better.
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Leeann
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« Reply #9 on: January 07, 2011, 02:04:30 PM »

I am definitely a fan of Arts & Crafts/Craftsman. Good choice Wink
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1973 Concord 20' Class A - 440/727
Griff in Fairbanks
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« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2011, 06:54:04 PM »

Been working on plans, materials lists, estimated cost, etc.  Because of the short building season and the need to spread material purchases out to match income, I've broken the project into three phases.  Each phase (and the associated tasks) intended to reach the end of each building season with the structure at a point where nothing will deteriorate while waiting for the next season's start.  (Depending on what I get done during the summer and fall, I may be able to continue some of the work during the winter and early spring.)

The following is the framing elevations for phase one,  (In order, south view, east view, north view, and west view.)

Note:  I'm using a modular braced shear wall construction and what appears to be sheathing is 5/8" OSB bracing.  (The local area is subject to strong seismic activity -- earthquakes -- equal to or greater than southern California.)


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Griff in Fairbanks
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« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2011, 07:06:10 PM »

Phase one completes the basement and phase two adds the main floor.


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* west_view.jpg (82.42 KB, 1170x808 - viewed 235 times.)
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Griff in Fairbanks
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« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2011, 07:13:20 PM »

Phase three adds the upper floor and competes the entryway/staircase section.

Note:  The roof is designed to be taken apart each spring and reassembled in the fall when each phase is complete.

(Only the south view and east view provided -- the north and west view can be inferred from these two views.)


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* east_view.jpg (100.25 KB, 1172x1055 - viewed 241 times.)
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Leeann
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« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2011, 08:36:42 PM »

I really like it, Griff - especially how you've designed it to cover itself while you have to wait for spring....then uncover until you have to cover it again.

Excellent engineering and architectural work  Cool
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Griff in Fairbanks
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« Reply #14 on: March 07, 2011, 11:17:45 AM »

Over the past several weeks, I've been working on a dimensionally accurate 3d model of the house to check various assembly and structural details.  The Microspot Interiors Professional software I use allows me to to look at the model from various angles, horizontally and vertically, and to zoom in on details.  (It also allows my wife and grandchildren to see what I have in mind.)

The panels in the picture below are not the outside sheathing ... they are structural shear wall members designed to resist racking forces from earthquakes and wind.  A layer of 7/16" OSB will be glued and screwed or nailed horizontally over the entire outside, with the siding applied over that.  The primary wall studs and plates will be 2x8s, kept to a minimum to reduce thermal bridging.  Between these will be a double layer of 2x4 framing, on 16" centers, with a roughly 1/2" thermal break between the inner and outer framing.  The wall cavities will be densely packed with blown-in cellulose insulation for a nominal R28 rating.  The vapor barrier will be applied inside the 2x8/2x4 framing, with 2x2s applied over that to provide space for electrical and plumbing runs.  (I'm probably going to add 1-1/2" thick XPS foam between the 2x2s to increase the insulation by roughly R7.5.)  This allows for an almost continuous vapor barrier by reducing penetrations to an absolute minimum.


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